Service

Our Office
We work with our patients so they can achieve and maintain a beautiful smile and healthier gums and teeth. We take the time with our patients to explain their treatment options and inform them of additional preventative care. We feel this will lead to a more trusting doctor/patient relationship and, for many people, relieve the stress about seeing a dentist.

We take pride in providing you with a comfortable office experience where our qualified staff is friendly and knowledgeable. Our main office is conveniently located in San Fernando, CA and we invite you to call with any questions or email us via the contact us or request an appointment page of our Web site. We will do everything possible to ensure you a pleasant visit.

Insurance and Billing
Our office accepts a variety of different insurance carriers. Please call our office and our staff will help determine your dental benefit as estimated by your insurance carrier.

 

We are currently adding content for this section. In order to be able to keep up with our high standards of service, we need a little more time. Please stop by again. Thank you for your interest!

"Please be advised that some of these services might need to be performed by specialized dentists and a referral to these dentists will be needed."

 

Tooth Whitening                                                               

Everybody loves a bright white smile, and there are a variety of products and procedures available to help you improve the look of yours.

Many people are satisfied with the sparkle they get from brushing twice daily with fluoride-containing toothpaste, cleaning between their teeth once a day and the regular cleanings at your dentist's office. If you decide you would like to go beyond this to make your smile look brighter, you should investigate all of your options.




You can take several approaches to whiten your smile:

  • In-office bleaching;
  • At-home bleaching;
  • Whitening toothpastes

At your visit we will go over the various approaches.
 

 

 

Veneers 

There's no reason to put up with gaps in your teeth or with teeth that are stained, badly shaped or crooked. Today a veneer placed on top of your teeth can correct nature's mistake or the results of an injury and help you have a beautiful smile.

Veneers are thin, custom-made shells crafted of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front side of teeth. They're made by a dental technician, usually in a dental lab, working from a model provided by your dentist.

You should know that this is usually an irreversible process, because it's necessary to remove a small amount of enamel from your teeth to accommodate the shell.

 

 

 

Pediatric Care Q & A

  1. When should my child first visit the dentist?
  2. Should I be giving my child fluoride drops or tablet?
  3. My child is over one year old and has no teeth. Should I worry?
  4. My child's permanent lower front tooth is coming in behind his baby tooth. What should be done?
  5. My child sucks his/her thumb or finger. What effect can it have on the bite, and when should I work on stopping the habit?
  6. I have heard that a nursing bottle can cause cavities on toddlers, at what age should I take my child off the bottle?
  7. What are the signs of teething, and what can I do to make my child more comfortable?.
  8. Why are baby teeth important? Don't they fall out?
  9. When can my child brush and floss their own teeth?

 

1. When should my child first visit the dentist?
The first dental visit should be between one year and eighteen months of age.
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2. Should I be giving my child fluoride drops or tablets.
No. The MDC water supply in the Boston area is fluoridated. If you live in an area outside of the Boston MDC water system, and you are not sure if your water is fluoridated, contact your local health department.
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3. My child is over one year old and has no teeth. Should I worry?
Even though most children that age have a number of teeth, some children may have delayed tooth eruption. There is usually no concern about this.
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4. My child's permanent lower front tooth is coming in behind his baby tooth. What should be done?
If the baby teeth are moderately to very loose, there is no immediate treatment. Patience is recommended. This is a normal process. The tongue will push the permanent lower front teeth forward. If the teeth are not very loose, your child should be seen to take an x-ray and evaluate the situation.
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5. My child sucks his/her thumb or finger. What effect can it have on the bite, and when should I work on stopping the habit?
Most children stop sucking their fingers between the ages of three to five. Sucking of a finger can have a significant effect on the bite. Flaring of the upper front teeth producing a protrusion, and backward positioning of the lower front teeth are common. Also a cross bite or narrowing of the upper jaw can occur producing an open bite, where the front teeth don't touch. The amount of these bite effects depend on the frequency, how long the child does it each time, and intensity of the finger habit. If your child continues this habit past the time of the eruption of the first permanent tooth. Then it can have a permanent effect on the adult bite. The habit should be stopped before these teeth come in. From a preventive point of view, infants should be given pacifiers, as they will do much less harm than finger habits, and most children will discontinue their use earlier.
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6. I have heard that a nursing bottle can cause cavities on toddlers, at what age should I take my child off the bottle?
Your child should stop using a bottle when they are old enough to hold a cup. This usually occurs around one year of age. After this age a child should not be placed to sleep with a bottle because this may cause dental decay, increase the incidence of ear infections, and prolong the use of the bottle. If you put your child to sleep with a bottle, the best way to stop this habit is by placing only water in the bottle, or progressively diluting it until it is all water. Then being firm with the child. Juice or milk in a cup will not cause the severe decay that a bottle will. This may cost the parents a bit of sleep, but it is important for future dental health.
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7. What are the signs of teething, and what can I do to make my child more comfortable?
The signs of teething are drooling, irritability, restlessness, and loss of appetite. Fever, illness, and diarrhea is not a symptom. If your child presents with the latter signs, they need to be evaluated by his or her pediatrician. The best solutions to comfort the child is to have the child chew on a cold or frozen rubber teething ring. Topical anesthetics are not recommended.
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8. Why are baby teeth important? Don't they fall out?
Baby teeth serve the important function of eating, speech, and esthetics (self image). These teeth not only help form the developing jaws, but they hold space for the permanent teeth so that a normal bite occurs. The last baby tooth falls out at about twelve years of age. A decayed baby tooth can become so badly decayed that it can do damage to the permanent tooth. At times severe infections of the face, head, and neck can be caused by infected baby teeth.
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9. When can my child brush and floss their own teeth?
We recommend that parents brush their children's teeth for the first five to seven years of life, since young children lack the manual dexterity of proper tooth brushing. The toothbrush should be a child's size, with soft nylon rounded bristles. Toothpaste should not be used until the child is able to spit (three to four years of age) to avoid swallowing it. A pea-sized drop should be dispensed by the parent for young children. Flossing should be performed by the parent prior to brushing. Most children lack the proper manual dexterity to floss on their own until the age of ten and will need a parent's help and supervision.
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Dentures/Partials: 

Dentures:

If you've lost all of your natural teeth, whether from periodontal disease, tooth decay or injury, complete dentures can replace your missing teeth and your smile. Replacing missing teeth will benefit your appearance and your health. Without support from the denture, facial muscles sag, making a person look older. You'll be able to eat and speak—things that people often take for granted until their natural teeth are lost.

There are various types of complete dentures. A conventional full denture is made and placed in the patient's mouth after the remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed which may take several months. An immediate complete denture is inserted as soon as the remaining teeth are removed. The dentist takes measurements and makes models of the patient's jaws during a preliminary visit. With immediate dentures, the denture wearer does not have to be without teeth during the healing period.

Even if you wear full dentures, you still must take good care of your mouth. Brush your gums, tongue and palate every morning with a soft-bristled brush before you insert your dentures to stimulate circulation in your tissues and help remove plaque.

 

Removable Denture Partial:

Removable partial dentures usually consist of replacement teeth attached to pink or gum-colored plastic bases, which are connected by metal framework. Removable partial dentures attach to your natural teeth with metal clasps or devices called precision attachments. Precision attachments are generally more esthetic than metal clasps and they are nearly invisible. Crowns on your natural teeth may improve the fit of a removable partial denture and they are usually required with attachments. Dentures with precision attachments generally cost more than those with metal clasps.

 

 

 

 

 

Crowns/Bridges: 

Crowns

If you want a smile that's your crowning glory, you may need a crown to cover a tooth and restore it to its normal shape and size. A crown can make your tooth stronger and improve its appearance.

It can cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there aren't enough teeth left. It can be used to attach a bridge, protect a weak tooth from breaking or restore one that's already broken. A crown is a good way to cover teeth that are discolored or badly shaped. It's also used to cover a dental implant.

 

 

Bridges

If you're missing one or more teeth, you may notice a difference in chewing and speaking. There are options to help restore your smile.

Bridges help maintain the shape of your face, as well as alleviating the stress in your bite by replacing missing teeth.

Sometimes called a fixed partial denture, a bridge replaces missing teeth with artificial teeth, looks great, and literally bridges the gap where one or more teeth may have been. The restoration can be made from gold, alloys, porcelain or a combination of these materials and is bonded onto surrounding teeth for support.

Unlike a removable bridge, which you can take out and clean, a fixed bridge can only be removed by a dentist

An implant bridge attaches artificial teeth directly to the jaw or under the gum tissue. Depending on which type of bridge your dentist recommends, its success depends on its foundation. So it's very important to keep your remaining teeth healthy and strong.

 

Root Canal

Once upon a time, if you had a tooth with a diseased nerve, you'd probably lose that tooth. Today, with a special dental procedure called a root canal therapy you may save that tooth. Inside each tooth is the pulp which provides nutrients and nerves to the tooth, it runs like a thread down through the root. When the pulp is diseased or injured, the pulp tissue dies. If you don't remove it, your tooth gets infected and you could lose it. After the dentist removes the pulp, the root canal is cleaned and sealed off to protect it. Then your dentist places a crown over the tooth to help make it stronger.

Most of the time, a root canal is a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile!

 

 

Tooth Colored Fillings

Constant pressure from chewing, grinding or clenching can cause dental fillings, or restorations, to wear away, chip or crack. If the seal between the tooth enamel and the restoration breaks down, food particles and decay-causing bacteria can work their way under the restoration. You then run the risk of developing additional decay in that tooth. Decay that is left untreated can progress to infect the dental pulp and may cause an abscess.

If the restoration is large or the recurrent decay is extensive, there may not be enough tooth structure remaining to support a replacement filling. In these cases, we may need to replace the filling with a crown.

 

 

 

Intra-oral Photography

We have 20-inch monitors mounted in every treatment room wired into a small TV camera in a hand piece. Using this special camera we are able to see your teeth enlarged 30 times on the screen. You will be able to see and understand the conditions of your mouth better.

 

 

 

Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is an infection of the tissues that support your teeth. Your gum tissue is not attached to the teeth as high as it may seem. There is a very shallow v-shaped crevice called a sulcus between the tooth and gums. Periodontal diseases attack just below the gum line in the sulcus, where they cause the attachment of the tooth and it's supporting tissues to break down. As the tissues are damaged, the sulcus develops into a pocket: generally, the more severe the disease, the greater the depth of the pocket.

Periodontal diseases are classified according to the severity of the disease. The two major stages are gingivitis and periodontitis. Gingivitis is a milder and reversible form of periodontal disease that only affects the gums. Gingivitis may lead to more serious, destructive forms of periodontal disease called periodontitis.

Some factors increase the risk of developing periodontal disease:

  • Tobacco smoking or chewing
  • Systemic diseases such as diabetes
  • Some types of medication such as steroids, some types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives
  • Bridges that no longer fit properly
  • Crooked teeth
  • Fillings that have become defective
  • Pregnancy or use of oral contraceptives

Several warning signs that can signal a problem:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Permanent teeth that are loose or separating
  • Any change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite
  • Any change in the fit of partial dentures

It is possible to have periodontal disease and have no warning signs. That is one reason why regular dental checkups and periodontal examinations are very important. Treatment methods depend upon the type of disease and how far the condition has progressed. Good oral hygiene at home is essential to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or recurring. You don't have to lose teeth to periodontal disease. Brush, clean between your teeth, eat a balanced diet, and schedule regular dental visits for a lifetime of healthy smiles.

 

Dental Implants

Crowns and conventional bridges or dentures may not be your only options when replacing missing teeth. For some people, dental implants offer a smile that looks and feels very natural. Surgically placed below the gums over a series of appointments, implants fuse to the jawbone and serve as a base for individual replacement teeth, bridges or a denture.

Implants offer stability because they fuse to your bone. Integration of the implants into your jaw also helps your replacement teeth feel more natural and some people also find the secure fit more comfortable than conventional substitutes.

Candidates for dental implants need to have healthy gums and adequate bone to support the implant. A thorough evaluation will help determine whether you are a good candidate for dental implants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sports Dentistry

Anyone who participates in a sport that carries a significant risk of injury should wear a mouth protector. This includes a wide range of sports like football, hockey, basketball, baseball, gymnastics, and volleyball.

Mouth protectors, which typically cover the upper teeth, can cushion a blow to the face, minimizing the risk of broken teeth and injuries to the soft tissues of the mouth. If you wear braces or another fixed dental appliance on your lower jaw, your dentist may suggest a mouth protector for these teeth as well.

Accidents can happen during any physical activity. A mouth protector can help cushion a blow to the face that otherwise might result in an injury to the mouth. A misdirected elbow in a one-on-one basketball game or a spill off a bicycle can leave you with chipped or broken teeth, nerve damage to a tooth or even tooth loss. A mouth protector can limit the risk of such injuries as well as protect the soft tissues of your tongue, lips and cheek lining.

A properly fitted mouth protector will stay in place while you are wearing it, making it easy for you to talk and breathe.

 

Orthodontics

An orthodontic problem is called a malocclusion, meaning "bad bite." Some examples of causes of malocclusion are crowded teeth, extra teeth, missing teeth or jaws that are out of alignment. Most malocclusions are inherited, although some can be acquired. Acquired malocclusions can be caused by accidents, early or late loss of baby teeth, or sucking of the thumb or fingers for a prolonged period of time.

Children and adults can both benefit from orthodontics. It is recommended that every child receive an orthodontic evaluation by age seven. Treatment may take a little longer for adults. Because an adult's facial bones are no longer growing, certain corrections may not be accomplished with braces alone. The average treatment time is about 24 months and varies with individual patients. Usually, adult treatment takes a little longer than a child's treatment.